Aug 022011
 

Snoop A must have for any WPF developer As a WPF developer, I often find myself trying to debug the visual structure of my applications or to find out why something doesn’t work as expected. The Visual Studio debugger can help up to a certain point, but for runtime visual debugging it lacks the necessary features. Luckily, there is an awesome free tool that you can use for this – Snoop. The tool itself is very straightforward – you select your running application press a button and you can see the whole visual tree:

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Jul 282011
 

I find that with the extension support in VS2010, programmers don’t really have an excuse for not using tools to increase their productivity and to increase the overall quality of their work. I am a really lazy programmer, in the sense that I don’t’ like to do repetitive boring tasks. Extensions are one of the solutions to being a happy lazy programmer. The other one is writing quality code, but that’s another story. So here is a list of all Extensions that I use in day-to-day work

 My list of Visual Studio 2010 Extensions
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May 172011
 

 

I often work on various branches of the same project (using TFS). This means that I have folders setup like:

[root]/Project

[root]/Branch A/Project

[root]/Branch X/Project

Sometimes I have to keep multiple Visual Studio instances open at the same time with branches of the same project and because by default VS2010 only displays the solution name in the title bar, switching between different windows can become very confusing.

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May 102010
 

In the first part I’ve written about creating a code generator in VS2008 to eliminate repetitive coding.

The series is divided into four parts:

Part I  – creating a Visual Studio Package

Part II (this one) – creating and registering a code generator

Part III – generating code & debugging

Part IV – creating the setup project and deploying the package

So let’s jump directly to the problem at hand:

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May 072010
 

I am a big fan of the DRY principle. This means that whenever I can do something that can be reused with minimal or no effort, I try to do it. Recently I’ve started developing a REST framework for our projects, which is not based on WCF (will blog about this too). One of the most problematic areas is how to create service proxies easily without having to duplicate loads of code, but at the same time maintain maximum flexibility. After going through several options, the most attractive is creating a Visual Studio custom code generator.

Since there are almost no resources (and the existing ones are very blurry) I’ve decided to create a series of blogs that will be a guide to creating custom code generators, followed by some other posts with real examples and solutions to problems.

The series is divided into four parts:

Part I (this one) – creating a Visual Studio Package

Part II – creating and registering a code generator

Part III – generating code & debugging

Part IV – creating the setup project and deploying the package

*DISCLAIMER* – Even if everybody is in the new VS2010 hype, I still think there are a lot of developers that are and will be working in VS2008 for a while.

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